Tag Archives: sports hub

Winners for World Architectural Festival 2014 in Singapore (our Sports Hub is also a winner)

After three days of the World Architecture Festival in Singapore, the festival’s super-jury has awarded the prestigious World Building of the Year award to The Chapel, Vietnam, designed by a21studio.

The Chapel is a community space in a new urban ward on the outskirt of Ho Chi Minh City. As a result of estate crisis, the surrounding area is lacking communal centres; therefore, the Chapel is designed to be the place for people to participate in activities such as conferences, weddings and exhibitions.

The judges commended the way the project embraced history and modernity, creating maximum effect with minimum materials. Paul Finch, WAF programme director, said: “Colour and light have been deployed to put people at ease and the architect has found poetry in the mundane.”

Civic and community: The Chapel by a21studio

Singapore Sports Hub, by Singapore Sports Hub Design Team, won the Completed Buildings – Sport award.

Located on a 35 hectare waterfront site close to the heart of Singapore, the newly opened Sports Hub provides a wide range of sporting, retail and leisure spaces within easy reach of the city centre and international airport.

At the heart of the Sports Hub is the new National Stadium whose dome has a span of over 310m, making it the largest free spanning dome structure in the world. It will be the first stadium in the world custom designed to host athletics, football, rugby and cricket all in one venue,

Sport: Singapore Sports Hub by Singapore Sports Hub Design Team

The super-jury festival’s comprised a selection of the world’s leading architects and designers, led by renowned British architect Richard Rogers, and included Rocco Yim (Hong Kong), Julie Eizenberg (USA), Enric Ruiz Geli (Spain) and Peter Rich (South Africa).

Previous winners of the World Building of the Year Award include Luigi Bocconi University, Milan, designed by Irish practice Grafton Architects (2008); Mapungubwe Interpretation Centre in South Africa, designed by Peter Rich Architects of Johannesburg (2009); MAXXI (National Museum of the 21st Century Arts) in Rome, designed by Zaha Hadid Architects (2010); Media TIC, designed by Cloud 9 Architects (2011); Gardens By The Bay, designed by Wilkinson Eyre, Grant Associates, Atelier One and Atelier Ten (2012); and Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki by Frances-Jones Morehen Thorp (2013).

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/world-architecture-festival-2014-building-year-award-winners-1468425

Sports Hub extends free trial for facilities to Aug 17

http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/sport/sports-hub-extends-free/1280972.html

2014-07-06 16.54.38

The extension is part of the National Day celebrations. The National Day Parade will also be screened at the Sports Hub.

As part of Singapore’s National Day celebrations, the Singapore Sports Hub has decided to extend the free use of its facilities till Aug 17. So if you missed out on getting tickets to this year’s National Day Parade (NDP), you can catch all the action on a giant screen at the Sports Hub, as it celebrates the nation’s 49th birthday.

The screening of the NDP at the Sports Hub follows the successful free screenings of the World Cup matches. The free trials, originally slated for the whole month of July, have proved popular with the public, with usage rates hitting about 90 per cent to date. Badminton and swimming have attracted the most number of bookings.

Once the free trial period is over, the Sports Hub will charge a fee for the use of these facilities. The rates, to be announced later, will be aligned with that of other sports facilities in Singapore.

“The free trials will give us feedback on what the public want,” said the Singapore Sports Hub’s Chief Operating Officer Oon Jin Teik. “We will adjust the rates and timings accordingly to make it easily accessible and affordable for all.”

Expiry date for Dakota Crescent flats in 2016

Dakota Crescent, one of Singapore’s oldest public housing estates, is making way for developments under Mountbatten’s estate renewal plans.

Residents of the 17 low-rise rental blocks off Old Airport Road must leave by end-2016. Those who choose to buy a new flat anywhere else will get a relocation grant of up to S$15,000.

Only about 400 of the 648 units, built by the Singapore Improvement Trust in 1958, are occupied and about two-thirds of the households have at least one member aged 60 and above.

Retiree Lee Choong Hian, 68, who lives alone in a two-room rental flat, will miss the estate where he has lived for 20 years. “The environment is good. At night it’s peaceful, and transport is convenient,” he said.

Those who want to keep renting will get priority and their rents will not go up. Their options of one- or two-room flats include those in a new block in nearby Cassia Crescent, to be completed in 2016.

They can also choose to buy a new flat from the HDB. Eligible first-timers will get a Central Provident Fund relocation grant of S$15,000 for families or singles jointly buying a place; lone singles get S$7,500.

This grant is being offered for the first time in this relocation exercise. All tenants will also get a moving allowance of S$1,000.

The estate was named by experts as a piece of public housing history that should be saved. It was also one of the sites deemed “sacred” by readers in a Straits Times poll.

The HDB said Blocks 13 and 21 “will be retained for interim use, as there is no immediate redevelopment plan”.

“Purely from a heritage point of view, I think it certainly has value,” said Dr Yeo Kang Shua, conservation architect and Singapore Heritage Society secretary, while agreeing that the state has to balance competing needs.

Mountbatten Member of Parliament Lim Biow Chuan said: “Those who like the heritage mostly don’t live here.”

Even residents who do not welcome the move acknowledge that it has been a long time coming. Mr Yap Boon Hoo, 59, said: “We’ve lived here so many decades, we knew it was just a matter of time.”

The HDB said it would “take cognisance of the social memories of the area when redevelopment takes place in the future”.

The estate’s landmarks include an old-school playground with a blue mosaic-tiled dove design and a provision shop dating back to 1959, revived as a cafe last month.

– See more at: http://news.asiaone.com/news/singapore/2016-expiry-date-dakota-crescent-flats#sthash.hR7jAmT9.dpuf

Dakota Crescent – Where time stands still

A SWANKY new National Stadium rises in Kallang. Two years ago, the nearby Goodman Arts Centre opened its doors to a hip young crowd. One street away, a new condominium has been built on the site of Housing Board flats.

But amid these changes, time has passed by Dakota Crescent, one of Singapore’s oldest HDB estates, located off Old Airport Road. The 17 blocks of low-rise flats have hardly changed since being built in 1958.

No wonder, then, that their retro architecture and old-school playground make them a hot spot for photographers and artists.

“It’s rare to see such old flats,” said Mr Renalto Wong, 25, who was there on a Sunday, sketching a 54-year-old provision shop that recently closed down. “There’s something comfortable and nostalgic about this place – it’s almost like a hideout.”

The estate was named after the Douglas DC-3 Dakota, a model of plane that landed at Kallang Airport in the past.

Built by the Singapore Improvement Trust (SIT) – the forerunner of the HDB – most of the 600 flats are leased to low-income families under the board’s public rental scheme. The flats are occupied mostly by elderly residents, who pay as low as $26 a month for a one-room flat and $44 a month for a two-room flat.

Scrap-goods buyer Ng Guan Swee, 68, has lived in Dakota Crescent since it was built.

“There was a fire in Cecil Street in the 50s and our house got burned down, so we were allocated a house in Dakota Crescent,” he recalled in Mandarin.

At that time, Mr Ng’s grandmother had bound feet – as was the custom in her day – and the family requested a ground-level unit. Theirs, at Block 20, has been home to Mr Ng and his sister for more than 50 years.

“When we came in 1958, there were no streetlights,” said Mr Ng, sitting amid old laser disc players, hi-fi sets and other vintage items in his home. He remembers traversing the dark streets to go to the nearby Guillemard shophouses for snacks.

But in the 1960s, as more families moved in, a market sprang up opposite the estate.

“Almost every unit in this estate was occupied. Neighbours knew one another and our doors were always open,” said Mr Ng. “Those were good times.”

Madam Yong Fong Keow, 64, who moved there in the 60s, also misses such communal life.

Gesturing at a new condominium, she said in Mandarin: “There was a bakery there. At 3pm or 4pm, we would smell the aroma of freshly baked bread. That’s when you grabbed some money and a neighbour and went to buy bread.”

But now, communal life in Dakota is a shadow of what it used to be. Only about 60 per cent of the units are occupied. Of a row of four shops, only two – both Chinese medicine clinics – remain.

Neighbours started moving out in the 90s, some to live with their children.

Then, a new wave of tenants moved there in 2005 when the HDB leased empty units to private operators, who, in turn, rented them to foreign workers.

“You could hear Thai accents, Filipino accents and Chinese accents around the neighbourhood, it was like a mini United Nations,” Mr Ng joked.

While some residents got used to these new faces, others did not.

Madam Amy De Silva, a long-time resident in her 60s, said: “Some of them were rowdy and you could hear them coming home late at night. Their living habits just didn’t suit ours.”

The HDB’s agreement with the managing agent ended last year and the foreign workers have since moved out of the Dakota estate.

However, at Block 32, an empty unit is littered with cardboard boxes and clothes. Mr Y.Y Goh, 57, a resident, said foreign workers live there but they do not disturb anyone.

One empty unit in Block 12, though, has become a party spot for teens. “They drink, eat, smoke, and mess the place up,” said a resident who wanted to be known only as Mr Zhang.

When The Straits Times visited, there were drink cans, chip packets and cardboard boxes in the unit.

In another vacant unit in Block 16, graffiti was scrawled on the walls. Some residents suspect teenagers sniffed glue there – some were spotted going into the unit with bags over their noses.

The HDB said that it has received complaints about crime and mischief in the area and informed the police.

But Dakota, now somewhat of a ghost town, may soon be more crowded again. The HDB said it is offering empty units as interim housing to needy families awaiting new flats. They were expected to start moving in progressively from last month. It has not indicated any long-term plans to develop the estate, however.

Although Dakota has been dubbed an “old people’s estate”, the few young faces who live there have no complaints.

“It’s a five-minute walk from Dakota and Mountbatten MRT stations, we have the Old Airport Road hawker centre and I hang out with friends at the Kallang Leisure Park nearby,” said Mr Kartigesan Saravanan, 20, who has lived in Dakota for the past 13 years. “It’s really a good location.”

Indeed, resident Bill Koh, who is in his 50s, said: “So many new buildings are coming up around us, it’s hard not to worry what might happen.

“People always come here and say how nice this estate is. There’s lots of green space between these old flats. It’s a pity if one of Singapore’s oldest estates is gone – maybe they should consider conserving it.”
– See more at: http://www.straitstimes.com/the-big-story/case-you-missed-it/story/suburb-where-time-stands-still-20131104#sthash.FKBJBMLk.dpuf

 

 

 

Night lights from the kallang riverside

Serene waterfront views on the Kallang Riverside. Lights in the night. The Indoor Stadium, the new Sports Hub, Tanjong Rhu condos (Costa Rhu, Pebble Bay). The Flyer. Marina Bay. Beautiful.

Was jogging along this scenic park, and was mesmerized by the lights. This is also part of Kampong Bugis where the upcoming masterplan mentioned about the new development plans in Singapore. I also saw a new showflat coming up here. A freehold property launch in a few weeks time. Pricing? It will be interesting to know how much it will fetch to enjoy such a wonderful waterfront view.

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